David’s Live Fish Foods

Culturing White worms

Whiteworms are one of the better live fish foods there is if you are feeding fish 1 1/2" to 4'-5". If you are keeping foot long fish, a whiteworm is probably not going to be seen, muich less eaten. There are a lot of ways to grow white worms. I will show you a couple of ways that I do it. They all depend on one element - cool temps. Temperatures in the high 50s, low 60s work the best for me. How do you provide that temperature? Especially if you are in the south like I am? The really really easy way, and the 'got to get into the routine' easy way. The really really easy way is to get a wine cooler. They will naturally set to chill in the range we want. Can you use a regular refrigerator? Of the four refrigerators I have tried, none will go that low. What happens at a lower temp? Best case, the worms do not grow, just linger. Worst case? They all die. The smell will tell you which case you got. The 'got to get into the routine' easy way? Needs an insulated cooler, a couple of large cold packs, and a towel. If you don't have large cold packs, then a couple of gallon size plastic bags with ice cubes will work. Just make a couple of them, you will need to rotate them every day. Take the cooler, put in the cold pack, put a towel on top, place the containers of whiteworms and media on top. Put in a thermometer so you can see you the temperature is doing. Swap the cold pack every day with a fresh one. Once you have done this for a couple of weeks, start watching Craigs List, the local paper and garage sales for a used wine cooler. If there is a local wine store or regular liquor store, they most likely have some sort of community board. Check for people selling their wine coolers. You won't regret it. Mine is the size of a dorm refrigerator. Now when you get your wine cooler, most likely the first thing you will notice is that a plastic shoe box won't fit inside. Measure the space you have and take off for the grocery store, Walmart, of other store that sells the reusable plastic food storage containers. There is a reusable container that is roughly 3/4 the size of a plastic shoe box. It fits my wine cooler perfectly. I can get 8 of them into the wine cooler. 2 accross, 2 high on each of 2 shelves. I took out the lower shelf and put the boxes on the bottom of the wine cooler. Now for the containers. I want some air holes to let out some of the excess moisture the boxes will get and to keep the air fresh for the worms. Since I stack the boxes, I drill small holes on the ends of the box sides. Next step. The media for the worms. You actually have lots of choices here. I don't like pure peat moss. I find it too hard to get wet, then when it does get wet it is dripping wet. I want a mixture of materials. I use bags of seed starter from the local nursery. Lots of brands to choose from. Right now I have both Miracle Gro Organic Choice Potting Mix and Ferry-Morse Organic Seed Starter Mix.  They usually say they have some fertilizer in them. The fertilizer is either 'BB' sized slow release balls that can be easily picked out or so small and so little I just ignore. I try to mix in just a little calcium or lime or oyster shell dust. Just a little to give some additional buffering ability to the soil. I put about 1" into the container and use a pump hand spray bottle of water to wet the mixture. Maybe just add some water to get it started, then spray. To begin with, I want the mixture to almost stick together but not quite. Damp only.  When it gets to this point it is ready to go into the wine cooler to come to temperature for the worms. By the next day it is ready to use. It will get wetter and wetter as time goes on and the white woms grow and reproduce. Obviously to start a whiteworm culture, you need some whiteworms. You can get them online or from a club member who raises them. If you already have whiteworms and are just starting a new culture, then use a trowel or big spoon and lift out some soil, lots of worms, and a piece of the bread and yogurt or whatever you are feeding. Slide that into the new culture box. Put on the lid and off into the refrigerator it goes. Remember, there are not many worms in that container so go easy on the food and water spraying. When you next check the box, it is going to look like there are no worms. Don't worry, they have just gone down into the media. If the food is gone, put in fresh. If the food has gone moldy, take it out and put in a smaller amount. And I tend to have problems with new cultures drying out, so I have to watch and spray more on a new culture. As the culture grows and matures, you will notice the container gets heavier and heavier. Careful, that is water building up in the soil. And considering how many worms you are growing in the media and have already harvested, the water is pretty nasty. Start a new culture before this one goes 'south'. As a rule of thumb, the day you just flat out can not believe how many worms you are getting is the day before the 'big stink', so keep different age cultures going. Below is ‘start to finish’ care of white worms video Check it out and please subscribe to my youtube channel to stay up to date wit hmy newest videos.
David’s Live Fish Foods

Culturing White worms

Whiteworms are one of the better live fish foods there is if you are feeding fish 1 1/2" to 4'- 5". If you are keeping foot long fish, a whiteworm is probably not going to be seen, muich less eaten. There are a lot of ways to grow white worms. I will show you a couple of ways that I do it. They all depend on one element - cool temps. Temperatures in the high 50s, low 60s work the best for me. How do you provide that temperature? Especially if you are in the south like I am? The really really easy way, and the 'got to get into the routine' easy way. The really really easy way is to get a wine cooler. They will naturally set to chill in the range we want. Can you use a regular refrigerator? Of the four refrigerators I have tried, none will go that low. What happens at a lower temp? Best case, the worms do not grow, just linger. Worst case? They all die. The smell will tell you which case you got. The 'got to get into the routine' easy way? Needs an insulated cooler, a couple of large cold packs, and a towel. If you don't have large cold packs, then a couple of gallon size plastic bags with ice cubes will work. Just make a couple of them, you will need to rotate them every day. Take the cooler, put in the cold pack, put a towel on top, place the containers of whiteworms and media on top. Put in a thermometer so you can see you the temperature is doing. Swap the cold pack every day with a fresh one. Once you have done this for a couple of weeks, start watching Craigs List, the local paper and garage sales for a used wine cooler. If there is a local wine store or regular liquor store, they most likely have some sort of community board. Check for people selling their wine coolers. You won't regret it. Mine is the size of a dorm refrigerator. Now when you get your wine cooler, most likely the first thing you will notice is that a plastic shoe box won't fit inside. Measure the space you have and take off for the grocery store, Walmart, of other store that sells the reusable plastic food storage containers. There is a reusable container that is roughly 3/4 the size of a plastic shoe box. It fits my wine cooler perfectly. I can get 8 of them into the wine cooler. 2 accross, 2 high on each of 2 shelves. I took out the lower shelf and put the boxes on the bottom of the wine cooler. Now for the containers. I want some air holes to let out some of the excess moisture the boxes will get and to keep the air fresh for the worms. Since I stack the boxes, I drill small holes on the ends of the box sides. Next step. The media for the worms. You actually have lots of choices here. I don't like pure peat moss. I find it too hard to get wet, then when it does get wet it is dripping wet. I want a mixture of materials. I use bags of seed starter from the local nursery. Lots of brands to choose from. Right now I have both Miracle Gro Organic Choice Potting Mix and Ferry-Morse Organic Seed Starter Mix.  They usually say they have some fertilizer in them. The fertilizer is either 'BB' sized slow release balls that can be easily picked out or so small and so little I just ignore. I try to mix in just a little calcium or lime or oyster shell dust. Just a little to give some additional buffering ability to the soil. I put about 1" into the container and use a pump hand spray bottle of water to wet the mixture. Maybe just add some water to get it started, then spray. To begin with, I want the mixture to almost stick together but not quite. Damp only.  When it gets to this point it is ready to go into the wine cooler to come to temperature for the worms. By the next day it is ready to use. It will get wetter and wetter as time goes on and the white woms grow and reproduce. Obviously to start a whiteworm culture, you need some whiteworms. You can get them online or from a club member who raises them. If you already have whiteworms and are just starting a new culture, then use a trowel or big spoon and lift out some soil, lots of worms, and a piece of the bread and yogurt or whatever you are feeding. Slide that into the new culture box. Put on the lid and off into the refrigerator it goes. Remember, there are not many worms in that container so go easy on the food and water spraying. When you next check the box, it is going to look like there are no worms. Don't worry, they have just gone down into the media. If the food is gone, put in fresh. If the food has gone moldy, take it out and put in a smaller amount. And I tend to have problems with new cultures drying out, so I have to watch and spray more on a new culture. As the culture grows and matures, you will notice the container gets heavier and heavier. Careful, that is water building up in the soil. And considering how many worms you are growing in the media and have already harvested, the water is pretty nasty. Start a new culture before this one goes 'south'. As a rule of thumb, the day you just flat out can not believe how many worms you are getting is the day before the 'big stink', so keep different age cultures going. Below is ‘start to finish’ care of white worms video Check it out and please subscribe to my youtube channel to stay up to date wit hmy newest videos.