David’s Live Fish Foods

Vinegar Eels - Turbatrix aceti

Starting a culture

You've come into

your fish room

and turned on

the lights. Now

you are looking

around and boy are you excited. There is a brand-

new batch of fry from those cool fish you been

trying to breed for a long time. So off you go to get

food for them. NJaturally, for some reason the

brine shrimp have either not hatched or there is

very very few of them. No problem, you will feed

the microworms. Oh no, that container was last

started three months ago> You do not even want to

lift the lid. This is going to smell so bad.

What are you going to feed this brand-new batch

of fry? The easiest food for these new fry is

vinegar eels. They are you ultimate backup plan.

Vinegar eels have to literally be the easiest fish

food to have on hand to feed fry. These can either

be the planned food for feeding small fry, or this

could be your emergency food when your regular

food has failed you.

Here is how easy vinegar eel culture is to do. You

need a couple of things. You need a jar or bottle to

keep the eels in. You need some apple cider vinegar,

some water, and a paper towel or a coffee filter

and a rubber band. And then most important of all

you need to actually have a vinegar

eels starter culture of some sort. Plus these

vinegar eels are going to be hungry so grab the

apple that you are supposed to be eating  every day,

and bite off a little piece of it to put in your

vinegar real culture.

If your bottle or jar has a narrow neck, then do not

consider that when filling the jar. You need the air

to exchange with the culture, so only fill your

bottle to the top of the wide area. Take your jar,

and fill it half-full with apple cider vinegar. Now fill

it up with an equal amount of water.

Starting a Vinegar Eel Culture Video
I use bottled water because I do not want to take a chance on the chlorine or chloramines killing my vinegar eels. I want water that is free of any chlorine. Into this mixture of half water, half vinegar eels you want to add your starter culture. Now add your little piece of apple, put the paper towel or coffee filter on top and attach it with a rubber band. Guess what, your culture is started. You are done. You can easily come back in six months and find that this vinegar eel culture is been getting along just fine without you. You may need to add some water to cover evaporation. Depending upon how many you vinegar eels your intial culture started with, your culture will be ready to use in three weeks or so. But you put it on the shelf and you will have food ready for you in an emergency any time you need. You have to do absolutely nothing with the culture for months on end. I try to keep two or three going because when I get caught with a lot of fry I can go through a lot of vinegar eels. And then once or twice a year I will start new cultures and retire the old ones. Now what seriously could be easier than that. Start a vinegar eel culture and have some food ready for those emergencies when the fry have got to eat and you have nothing to offer them.
David’s Live Fish Foods

Vinegar Eels - Turbatrix aceti

Starting a culture

You've come into your fish room and turned on the lights.

Now you are looking around and boy are you excited. There

is a brand-new batch of fry from those cool fish you been

trying to breed for a long time. So off you go to get food

for them. NJaturally, for some reason the brine shrimp

have either not hatched or there is very very few of them.

No problem, you will feed the microworms. Oh no, that

container was last started three months ago> You do not

even want to lift the lid. This is going to smell so bad.

What are you going to feed this brand-new batch of fry?

The easiest food for these new fry is vinegar eels. They

are you ultimate backup plan. Vinegar eels have to literally

be the easiest fish food to have on hand to feed fry.

These can either be the planned food for feeding small

fry, or this could be your emergency food when your

regular food has failed you.

Here is how easy vinegar eel culture is to do. You need a

couple of things. You need a jar or bottle to keep the eels

in. You need some apple cider vinegar, some water, and a

paper towel or a coffee filter and a rubber band. And then

most important of all you need to actually have a vinegar

eels starter culture of some sort. Plus these vinegar eels

are going to be hungry so grab the apple that you are

supposed to be eating  every day, and bite off a little piece

of it to put in your vinegar real culture.

If your bottle or jar has a narrow neck, then do not

consider that when filling the jar. You need the air to

exchange with the culture, so only fill your bottle to the

top of the wide area. Take your jar, and fill it half-full

with apple cider vinegar. Now fill it up with an equal amount

of water.

I use bottled water because I do not want to take a chance on the chlorine or chloramines killing my vinegar eels. I want water that is free of any chlorine. Into this mixture of half water, half vinegar eels you want to add your starter culture. Now add your little piece of apple, put the paper towel or coffee filter on top and attach it with a rubber band. Guess what, your culture is started. You are done. You can easily come back in six months and find that this vinegar eel culture is been getting along just fine without you. You may need to add some water to cover evaporation. Depending upon how many you vinegar eels your intial culture started with, your culture will be ready to use in three weeks or so. But you put it on the shelf and you will have food ready for you in an emergency any time you need. You have to do absolutely nothing with the culture for months on end. I try to keep two or three going because when I get caught with a lot of fry I can go through a lot of vinegar eels. And then once or twice a year I will start new cultures and retire the old ones. Now what seriously could be easier than that. Start a vinegar eel culture and have some food ready for those emergencies when the fry have got to eat and you have nothing to offer them.
Starting a Vinegar Eel Culture Video