David’s Live Fish Foods

Grindal Worm culture

Requirements - Plastic container with lid and filtered airholes Potting soil, seed starting mix, coconut coir Water for moistening the media Grindal worm starting culture High quality dry dog or dry cat food. Grindal worms fill the gap between the smaller foods(baby brine shrimp, micro worms) and the larger foods (white worms, black worms and chopped earthworms). There's a large gap in the middle where you can have a difficult time finding a food for your fish. You will notice this when you are raising fry that reach a stage and just stop growing. We all talk about fry that reach a certain size, and then they seem to just stop growing for a long time. For some fish this is a normal thing to happen. But I am finding that for most of my fry, this long stagnant no growth period is actually a sign that I'm not giving them the food they need to continue to thrive. Grindal worms are ideal at this size range to feed your fish. Grindal worms are another type of worm like white worms that many people will tell you are too fatty and not very nutritious. Their nutritional value depends upon what you have gut loaded them with. Feed the worms a very high quality grain free dog food or cat food. Read the ingredient label on the bag and know that is what you have stuffed the Grindal worm that your fish are eating. There are basically two ways to grow Grindal worms. One way is the way we've done it for forever. That is to grow them on a potting soil, seed starting mix or ground coconut coir. Whichever you use it is still considered to be a soil-based media. The other newer way that's only really come about in the last few years is called the soil-less method. This method uses scrubby pads or some kind of felt type pad that is damp to wet. The food is placed on the pads and the Grindal worms live in that. I have tried this soil-less method on many occasions and it always has a very smelly outcome. I have seen people who do remarkably well with it. I am just not one of them. I am going to tell you how to grow them on a soil-based media. I started out using potting soil and lately I have moved over to using the coconut core material. Either product works very well if you maintain its moisture level. The old-timers will tell you that it should be damp like pipe tobacco. I do not think I've ever actually touched pipe tobacco so I have no idea what that means. Basically you want the soil to be damp to the point that it almost sticks together if you squeeze it but not quite. What really is more important is that you start off with a good culture of Grindal worms and provide them with a really outstanding food source. A lot of the private pet shops will periodically have small sample bags that they will sell of the different really high quality dry dog and cat foods. In many cases these these samples are free. That means you can get enough food in one of these little bags free of charge to last you for probably close to a year. Otherwise if you have a dog or a cat do them a favor and start feeding them a much higher quality food. Drop out the grain, get rid of the additives and go with with a good quality pet food. Try to minimize the food colorings and preservatives. This will make a fantastic food for your Grindal worms. I use plastic containers that hold anywhere from a quart up to plastic shoebox size. I used the drill little holes in the sides of the top to provide airflow but that always seems to let the bugs in. So I've now gone to the method of cutting a little square in the top stuffing it with cotton or some filter material. That seems to work just as well and it keeps the bugs out. Once you have your media material damp to the proper proportions you want to add your your Grindal starter. Grindal worms cannot be found in your garden. Grindal worms do not appear from the sky. Grindal worms will not come out of your compost pile or out of a bag of grass clippings when you mow. You have to start with a Grindal worm culture that you've gotten from someone else. Add this to your media and give it a couple little pellets of the pet food. I keep a mister so that I can give it a little misting. This helps to maintain the moisture on the pet food and the soil surface. I usually feed every other day. I will remove any uneaten food that is starting to mold or starts becoming something else. Then I will replace it with fresh food. I then mist the soil and the food lightly to keep the moisture level up. Depending upon the size of your starter culture, this new culture that you are creating can be ready to start using in several weeks. If you will do your feeding along the edges of the container, you'll find the Grindal worms will climb up the sides much like micro worms to. You can harvest just with a damp figure swiping them out and place them into a smaller container with water. you can rinse them off this way. This is a really easy way to collect your Grindal worms.  You use a large eyedropper a small turkey baster to feed your fish. A good Grindal worm culture and a decent size container will last for months. I am not particularly fond of starting brand-new cultures, because it take a long time to get going strong. So what I will do is I will slowly start only feeding my Grindal worms on one half of the container. This will move all the worms to that half of the container because that's where the food is. Then I can take a a spatula or spoon or whatever I have and I can remove all of the soil from the other half of the container> This goes to the houseplants, vegetable plants or just the compost pile. I can then place new media into that half making sure that it is has enough moisture in it to keep the worms happy. Then I start moving the food first at the dividing line and then moving it so that the worms over the course of the next few weeks or month will be moved over to this new media. Then I can remove the other half of the soil which by now has also gone bad. Replacing back and forth that way, I have kept single Grindal worm containers going for years on end without ever actually starting it over. Another good way to process some of the soil as it slowly gets old is by making small cultures to give to other people. Since the only way you can have a Grindal worm culture is to get a starter from someone people are always looking for starters. The little section of the Grindal worm culture with Grindal worms that you scoop out then becomes an empty spot that you put fresh soil and. This keeps your culture with fresh soil and going strong. Once your Grindal worm culture is really thriving, you have to remember you have to harvest these worms. If you allow the the worm numbers to increased too much, they will destroy the soil and the whole thing will crash. Your first hint is the dirt will start to get a shiny look to it. It would it at that point Mormor the worms start climbing up and out of the dirt try to get away from it. This is usually when you're congratulating yourself on what a great job you doing culture your worms. In reality they are doing the abandoned ship program trying not to be killed by the completely trash soil you have them living in. So scoop a bunch of that soil out to get some fresh stuff and or will crash. If you're raising Barbs or Tetras or Danios, Killifish, Apistogrammas, Corydoras or any fish in that size range Grindal worms make an outstanding food for them. Fry from most of the larger fish there will have a stage where Grindal worms are good for them also. So consider adding Grindal worms to your food for your tropical fish. Below are 2 Youtube videos showing all of this in action. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos. There are several more videos about grindal worms on my channel. Enjoy!
David’s Live Fish Foods

Grindal Worm culture

Requirements - Plastic container with lid and filtered airholes Potting soil, seed starting mix, coconut coir Water for moistening the media Grindal worm starting culture High quality dry dog or dry cat food. Grindal worms fill the gap between the smaller foods(baby brine shrimp, micro worms) and the larger foods (white worms, black worms and chopped earthworms). There's a large gap in the middle where you can have a difficult time finding a food for your fish. You will notice this when you are raising fry that reach a stage and just stop growing. We all talk about fry that reach a certain size, and then they seem to just stop growing for a long time. For some fish this is a normal thing to happen. But I am finding that for most of my fry, this long stagnant no growth period is actually a sign that I'm not giving them the food they need to continue to thrive. Grindal worms are ideal at this size range to feed your fish. Grindal worms are another type of worm like white worms that many people will tell you are too fatty and not very nutritious. Their nutritional value depends upon what you have gut loaded them with. Feed the worms a very high quality grain free dog food or cat food. Read the ingredient label on the bag and know that is what you have stuffed the Grindal worm that your fish are eating. There are basically two ways to grow Grindal worms. One way is the way we've done it for forever. That is to grow them on a potting soil, seed starting mix or ground coconut coir. Whichever you use it is still considered to be a soil-based media. The other newer way that's only really come about in the last few years is called the soil-less method. This method uses scrubby pads or some kind of felt type pad that is damp to wet. The food is placed on the pads and the Grindal worms live in that. I have tried this soil-less method on many occasions and it always has a very smelly outcome. I have seen people who do remarkably well with it. I am just not one of them. I am going to tell you how to grow them on a soil-based media. I started out using potting soil and lately I have moved over to using the coconut core material. Either product works very well if you maintain its moisture level. The old-timers will tell you that it should be damp like pipe tobacco. I do not think I've ever actually touched pipe tobacco so I have no idea what that means. Basically you want the soil to be damp to the point that it almost sticks together if you squeeze it but not quite. What really is more important is that you start off with a good culture of Grindal worms and provide them with a really outstanding food source. A lot of the private pet shops will periodically have small sample bags that they will sell of the different really high quality dry dog and cat foods. In many cases these these samples are free. That means you can get enough food in one of these little bags free of charge to last you for probably close to a year. Otherwise if you have a dog or a cat do them a favor and start feeding them a much higher quality food. Drop out the grain, get rid of the additives and go with with a good quality pet food. Try to minimize the food colorings and preservatives. This will make a fantastic food for your Grindal worms. I use plastic containers that hold anywhere from a quart up to plastic shoebox size. I used the drill little holes in the sides of the top to provide airflow but that always seems to let the bugs in. So I've now gone to the method of cutting a little square in the top stuffing it with cotton or some filter material. That seems to work just as well and it keeps the bugs out. Once you have your media material damp to the proper proportions you want to add your your Grindal starter. Grindal worms cannot be found in your garden. Grindal worms do not appear from the sky. Grindal worms will not come out of your compost pile or out of a bag of grass clippings when you mow. You have to start with a Grindal worm culture that you've gotten from someone else. Add this to your media and give it a couple little pellets of the pet food. I keep a mister so that I can give it a little misting. This helps to maintain the moisture on the pet food and the soil surface. I usually feed every other day. I will remove any uneaten food that is starting to mold or starts becoming something else. Then I will replace it with fresh food. I then mist the soil and the food lightly to keep the moisture level up. Depending upon the size of your starter culture, this new culture that you are creating can be ready to start using in several weeks. If you will do your feeding along the edges of the container, you'll find the Grindal worms will climb up the sides much like micro worms to. You can harvest just with a damp figure swiping them out and place them into a smaller container with water. you can rinse them off this way. This is a really easy way to collect your Grindal worms.  You use a large eyedropper a small turkey baster to feed your fish. A good Grindal worm culture and a decent size container will last for months. I am not particularly fond of starting brand-new cultures, because it take a long time to get going strong. So what I will do is I will slowly start only feeding my Grindal worms on one half of the container. This will move all the worms to that half of the container because that's where the food is. Then I can take a a spatula or spoon or whatever I have and I can remove all of the soil from the other half of the container> This goes to the houseplants, vegetable plants or just the compost pile. I can then place new media into that half making sure that it is has enough moisture in it to keep the worms happy. Then I start moving the food first at the dividing line and then moving it so that the worms over the course of the next few weeks or month will be moved over to this new media. Then I can remove the other half of the soil which by now has also gone bad. Replacing back and forth that way, I have kept single Grindal worm containers going for years on end without ever actually starting it over. Another good way to process some of the soil as it slowly gets old is by making small cultures to give to other people. Since the only way you can have a Grindal worm culture is to get a starter from someone people are always looking for starters. The little section of the Grindal worm culture with Grindal worms that you scoop out then becomes an empty spot that you put fresh soil and. This keeps your culture with fresh soil and going strong. Once your Grindal worm culture is really thriving, you have to remember you have to harvest these worms. If you allow the the worm numbers to increased too much, they will destroy the soil and the whole thing will crash. Your first hint is the dirt will start to get a shiny look to it. It would it at that point Mormor the worms start climbing up and out of the dirt try to get away from it. This is usually when you're congratulating yourself on what a great job you doing culture your worms. In reality they are doing the abandoned ship program trying not to be killed by the completely trash soil you have them living in. So scoop a bunch of that soil out to get some fresh stuff and or will crash. If you're raising Barbs or Tetras or Danios, Killifish, Apistogrammas, Corydoras or any fish in that size range Grindal worms make an outstanding food for them. Fry from most of the larger fish there will have a stage where Grindal worms are good for them also. So consider adding Grindal worms to your food for your tropical fish. Below are 2 Youtube videos showing all of this in action. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos. There are several more videos about grindal worms on my channel. Enjoy!