David’s Live Fish Foods

Brine Shrimp - How to make a hatcher

Requirements - Plastic bottle similar to a 1/2 gallon orange juice container Knife, box cutter or strong scissors small heavy glass bowl to hold the upside down bottle stiff airline tubing and regular airline with air pump light available for collecting Hatching brine shrimp eggs is pretty much a universal activity of serious tropical fish keepers and breeders. Because of that, the number of ways that people set things up to hatch brine shrimp is huge. We all usually start out with pretty much the same method. We take a wide mouth jar, add some salt and water and add the eggs. Maybe we remember to add an airstone. Then we wait a couple of days and hope something hatches. Variations of this method will go for a long time.  For some people that is all they'll ever do. But brine shrimp eggs are expensive, and the more we rely on them, the more we need to ensure that they actually will hatch. We need a reliable source of baby brine shrimp every day. Once we reached this stage we have to come up with a better way to hatch the eggs. I have probably tried every way known to man in the last bazillion years to hatch brine shrimp eggs. This is the method I use to hatch them now. For the hatching container, I use one of the heavy-duty plastic containers that many different juices. Orange Juice bottles are particularly good. Once the bottle is cleaned out, I will will pour into the bottle a quart or liter of water. Then I place the lid on very tightly and turn the bottle over. The lid is pointing downward. I take a marker that will not rub off. I draw a line along that water level. This helps me know how full to fill the bottle and how much salt to add to get a consistent hatch of brine shrimp. Forgetting this stage will drive you nuts for a long time. I am going to want the bottle to have the small side down. That way the airline at the bottom will have more agitation in the small space. I need the wide end on the top so I am going to have to cut a hole in the bottom of the container. You can just slice around the sides of the bottle near the bottom. This is quick and easy but you will end up with a very flimsy container. It will work just fine. It just does not support itself as well as you might want. I find that it helps is to cut out the inside of the bottom leaving a little bit of the bottom lip. This maintains a very sturdy bottle. You can still get into the bottle to pour the water in and out and easily syphon the shrimp out.  This can be a little tricky to cut out because this is typically the strongest part of the bottle. It would be really nice if you did not cut yourself. You may want to drill a couple holes to start on the bottom. I used a box cutter to start with. I thought that was too hard so  Ichanged over to a heavy duty pair of scissors. That was even tougher so I went back to the box cutter.  I left about a half inch lip around the bottom of the bottle. The rest is cut out leaving a good size opening. This container is about ready to use. Now since you are going to be suspending the bottle upside down you need a way to keep it from falling over. I found a very very inexpensive glass jar that was either for a candle or snacks at a 'dollar' store. You may find that a you can reuse a small pickle jar or other small food jar.  What you want to do is be able to put the jar and upside down and have that base jar support the hatcher and keep it from falling over. I currently have three of these bottles going. I have two different kinds of containers supporting them. You want to screw the lid on the juice bottle very tightly so it does not leak. You may even want to put a little silicone sealer on the threads if you have some.  Now you can fill it with clean water up to the line. Add the salt that you need and then add the airline. This will get the salt all dissolved. The airline tubing that I use has on the end some still aquarium tubing similar to what would be in a box filter. You can buy this at the pet stores. I think it comes at about a 3 foot length and you cut whatever amount that you need. You want this stiff part so you can keep the airline at the very bottom of the hatcher. This will keep the shrimp and eggs up in the water column and not piling up on the bottom. If the eggs just clump on the bottom they will not hatch. If the brine shrimp are not suspended in the water they will also collect on the bottom and suffocate.

HOW TO HATCH BRINE SHRIMP

Brine shrimp are a great food for your fry and small tropical fish. Pretty good in the nutrition department, but what really

makes them such a great food for fry is how easy they are to hatch out. You can almost depend on being able to have

fresh newly hatched brine shrimp every day if that is what you need. And the requirements to hatch the eggs are

simple. Start with brine shrimp eggs. That can easily be the hardest part. I have bought a lot of brine shrimp eggs at

pet stores that do not hatch. I do not know why, but they do not hatch. But start with eggs from your favorite store. A

local source is always the best.  I use a lot of eggs so I buy several lbs at a time from an online store. They are always

good eggs. Add to 6-8 teaspoons salt per gallon of water. (2-3 teaspoons to a quart of water) in a clear bottle. Room

temperature or a little warmer. 24-36 hours later have live baby brine shrimp for your fish.

They are attracted to light. Put a light to the side of the clear container and the shrimp will swim to that spot. Then they

can be syphoned out into a filter material or brine shrimp net. Then rinse them in fresh water and feed to your fish.

Below is a youtube video showing all of this step by step. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos. There are several more videos about Brine shrimp on my channel. Enjoy!
Video of making a brine shrimp hatcher.
David’s Live Fish Foods

Brine Shrimp - How to make a hatcher

Requirements - Plastic bottle similar to a 1/2 gallon orange juice container Knife, box cutter or strong scissors small heavy glass bowl to hold the upside down bottle stiff airline tubing and regular airline with air pump light available for collecting Hatching brine shrimp eggs is pretty much a universal activity of serious tropical fish keepers and breeders. Because of that, the number of ways that people set things up to hatch brine shrimp is huge. We all usually start out with pretty much the same method. We take a wide mouth jar, add some salt and water and add the eggs. Maybe we remember to add an airstone. Then we wait a couple of days and hope something hatches. Variations of this method will go for a long time.  For some people that is all they'll ever do. But brine shrimp eggs are expensive, and the more we rely on them, the more we need to ensure that they actually will hatch. We need a reliable source of baby brine shrimp every day. Once we reached this stage we have to come up with a better way to hatch the eggs. I have probably tried every way known to man in the last bazillion years to hatch brine shrimp eggs. This is the method I use to hatch them now. For the hatching container, I use one of the heavy-duty plastic containers that many different juices. Orange Juice bottles are particularly good. Once the bottle is cleaned out, I will will pour into the bottle a quart or liter of water. Then I place the lid on very tightly and turn the bottle over. The lid is pointing downward. I take a marker that will not rub off. I draw a line along that water level. This helps me know how full to fill the bottle and how much salt to add to get a consistent hatch of brine shrimp. Forgetting this stage will drive you nuts for a long time. I am going to want the bottle to have the small side down. That way the airline at the bottom will have more agitation in the small space. I need the wide end on the top so I am going to have to cut a hole in the bottom of the container. You can just slice around the sides of the bottle near the bottom. This is quick and easy but you will end up with a very flimsy container. It will work just fine. It just does not support itself as well as you might want. I find that it helps is to cut out the inside of the bottom leaving a little bit of the bottom lip. This maintains a very sturdy bottle. You can still get into the bottle to pour the water in and out and easily syphon the shrimp out.  This can be a little tricky to cut out because this is typically the strongest part of the bottle. It would be really nice if you did not cut yourself. You may want to drill a couple holes to start on the bottom. I used a box cutter to start with. I thought that was too hard so  Ichanged over to a heavy duty pair of scissors. That was even tougher so I went back to the box cutter.  I left about a half inch lip around the bottom of the bottle. The rest is cut out leaving a good size opening. This container is about ready to use. Now since you are going to be suspending the bottle upside down you need a way to keep it from falling over. I found a very very inexpensive glass jar that was either for a candle or snacks at a 'dollar' store. You may find that a you can reuse a small pickle jar or other small food jar.  What you want to do is be able to put the jar and upside down and have that base jar support the hatcher and keep it from falling over. I currently have three of these bottles going. I have two different kinds of containers supporting them. You want to screw the lid on the juice bottle very tightly so it does not leak. You may even want to put a little silicone sealer on the threads if you have some.  Now you can fill it with clean water up to the line. Add the salt that you need and then add the airline. This will get the salt all dissolved. The airline tubing that I use has on the end some still aquarium tubing similar to what would be in a box filter. You can buy this at the pet stores. I think it comes at about a 3 foot length and you cut whatever amount that you need. You want this stiff part so you can keep the airline at the very bottom of the hatcher. This will keep the shrimp and eggs up in the water column and not piling up on the bottom. If the eggs just clump on the bottom they will not hatch. If the brine shrimp are not suspended in the water they will also collect on the bottom and suffocate.

HOW TO HATCH BRINE SHRIMP

Brine shrimp are a great food for your fry and small tropical fish. Pretty

good in the nutrition department, but what really makes them such a

great food for fry is how easy they are to hatch out. You can almost

depend on being able to have fresh newly hatched brine shrimp every

day if that is what you need. And the requirements to hatch the eggs are

simple. Start with brine shrimp eggs. That can easily be the hardest

part. I have bought a lot of brine shrimp eggs at pet stores that do not

hatch. I do not know why, but they do not hatch. But start with eggs from

your favorite store. A local source is always the best.  I use a lot of eggs

so I buy several lbs at a time from an online store. They are always

good eggs. Add to 6-8 teaspoons salt per gallon of water. (2-3

teaspoons to a quart of water) in a clear bottle. Room temperature or a

little warmer. 24-36 hours later have live baby brine shrimp for your fish.

They are attracted to light. Put a light to the side of the clear container

and the shrimp will swim to that spot. Then they can be syphoned out

into a filter material or brine shrimp net. Then rinse them in fresh water

and feed to your fish.

Below is a youtube video showing all of this step by step. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos. There are several more videos about Brine shrimp on my channel. Enjoy!
Video of making a brine shrimp hatcher.