David’s Live Fish Foods

Raising Adult Brine Shrimp Outdoors

Requirements - 1 or more Big Tubs or Containers Left over Brine Shrimp Hatching Water with unhatched eggs. Screening or plastic cover to keep the critters out morning sun to encourage algae growth Spirulina or powdered peas or very fine fish food and Selcon liquid for feeding I live in an Atlanta suburb. Atlanta has a phobia about mosquitoes and contracting West Nile virus. So any kind of standing water is a beacon for the electric/ water/ gas readers and anyone else looking around to report a health hazard. The solution? Standing water that is salt water. Raising up brine shrimp to adulthood outside is almost as easy as keeping daphnia. And no mosquitoes to cause problems with the city employees and the neighbors. Raising them up is pretty easy too. Here is how. Start off with a good size plastic container. I use the 18 gallon nylon rope handle round comtainers. Small watering troughs from Tractor Supply work well too. The big box stores have these really cool black plastic rectangular containers for mixing bags of concrete. They are designed to be thrown away after use but work really well. I dig them in a few inches and they last for years. Anything that is at least 1 foot deep and holds lots of water will do. Pick a spot in the yard that gets good morning sun and not too much afternoon sun. The afternoon sun will overheat the water and cook the brine shrimp. If you have to get the afternoon sun then partially bury the container or keep some straw or something around the container so the sides do not get hit with the harsh direct afternoon sun. You may have to try several different spots until you find the one that keeps the water warm, encourages some algae growth, but misses the extreme heat of the afternoon. Each day when your brine shrimp hatching water is finished syphon out the clear water in the middle of the bottle. Try to miss the empty hatched out shells floating on the top. These will just mess up your water. You want some of the unhatched eggs from the bottom. These will hatch and grow once they are outside. When you first start out, you won't have very much water in the container. That is ok, just keep putting the excess in every day. Pretty soon you will have plenty of water. As the eggs hatch the baby brine shrimp will be needing something to eat. If the algae is not growing in the tub, then give them a very very small amount of one of the foods listed above. I prefer spirulina powder and Selcon liquid. Just a drop of the liquid and a pinch of dry food. Each days new addition of brine shrimp water with some eggs will stagger out when the shrimp are hatching. That way you will have lots of different sizes of brine shrimp growing up. Great for you and your fish. Use a net that allows the smaller shrimp to excape and just collects the larger shrimp. That way your tub will provide you with adult brine shrimp for weeks and weeks. When the tub is full and the shrimp have all hatched out and been collected, dump at least part of it and start over. Two tubs with staggered starting can be kept going all summer. If you get a lot of rain you will need to cover the containers. The excess rain will dilute your salt water and cause problems. Keep a screen over the container, otherwise you will end up with a squirrel or bird falling in and totally destroying your hard work. Just easier to keep it covered with a screen. You can find big bungy cords to wrap around the container and keep the mosquito screening tight. If the empty brine shrimp egg shells get all over the top of the tubs they will cause problems. Lay some paper towels or newspaper on top and pull it off. The eggs will stick and come out with the paper. The baby brine shrimp outside will take about 3 weeks to grow up. Can you add an airline to bubble the water? Sure can. I do not because I do not have anyway to get an airline or a pump to the area I keep the tubs. So it is not a requirement. I go with the keep it simple method. Pour the left over water into the tub, cover it from the birds, toss in a little food and then collect big quantities of adult brine shrimp for my fish. You can do it too! Below are two Youtube videos showing all of this in action. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos.
David’s Live Fish Foods

Raising Adult Brine Shrimp Outdoors

Requirements - 1 or more Big Tubs or Containers Left over Brine Shrimp Hatching Water with unhatched eggs. Screening or plastic cover to keep the critters out morning sun to encourage algae growth Spirulina or powdered peas or very fine fish food and Selcon liquid for feeding I live in an Atlanta suburb. Atlanta has a phobia about mosquitoes and contracting West Nile virus. So any kind of standing water is a beacon for the electric/ water/ gas readers and anyone else looking around to report a health hazard. The solution? Standing water that is salt water. Raising up brine shrimp to adulthood outside is almost as easy as keeping daphnia. And no mosquitoes to cause problems with the city employees and the neighbors. Raising them up is pretty easy too. Here is how. Start off with a good size plastic container. I use the 18 gallon nylon rope handle round comtainers. Small watering troughs from Tractor Supply work well too. The big box stores have these really cool black plastic rectangular containers for mixing bags of concrete. They are designed to be thrown away after use but work really well. I dig them in a few inches and they last for years. Anything that is at least 1 foot deep and holds lots of water will do. Pick a spot in the yard that gets good morning sun and not too much afternoon sun. The afternoon sun will overheat the water and cook the brine shrimp. If you have to get the afternoon sun then partially bury the container or keep some straw or something around the container so the sides do not get hit with the harsh direct afternoon sun. You may have to try several different spots until you find the one that keeps the water warm, encourages some algae growth, but misses the extreme heat of the afternoon. Each day when your brine shrimp hatching water is finished syphon out the clear water in the middle of the bottle. Try to miss the empty hatched out shells floating on the top. These will just mess up your water. You want some of the unhatched eggs from the bottom. These will hatch and grow once they are outside. When you first start out, you won't have very much water in the container. That is ok, just keep putting the excess in every day. Pretty soon you will have plenty of water. As the eggs hatch the baby brine shrimp will be needing something to eat. If the algae is not growing in the tub, then give them a very very small amount of one of the foods listed above. I prefer spirulina powder and Selcon liquid. Just a drop of the liquid and a pinch of dry food. Each days new addition of brine shrimp water with some eggs will stagger out when the shrimp are hatching. That way you will have lots of different sizes of brine shrimp growing up. Great for you and your fish. Use a net that allows the smaller shrimp to excape and just collects the larger shrimp. That way your tub will provide you with adult brine shrimp for weeks and weeks. When the tub is full and the shrimp have all hatched out and been collected, dump at least part of it and start over. Two tubs with staggered starting can be kept going all summer. If you get a lot of rain you will need to cover the containers. The excess rain will dilute your salt water and cause problems. Keep a screen over the container, otherwise you will end up with a squirrel or bird falling in and totally destroying your hard work. Just easier to keep it covered with a screen. You can find big bungy cords to wrap around the container and keep the mosquito screening tight. If the empty brine shrimp egg shells get all over the top of the tubs they will cause problems. Lay some paper towels or newspaper on top and pull it off. The eggs will stick and come out with the paper. The baby brine shrimp outside will take about 3 weeks to grow up. Can you add an airline to bubble the water? Sure can. I do not because I do not have anyway to get an airline or a pump to the area I keep the tubs. So it is not a requirement. I go with the keep it simple method. Pour the left over water into the tub, cover it from the birds, toss in a little food and then collect big quantities of adult brine shrimp for my fish. You can do it too! Below are two Youtube videos showing all of this in action. Please subscribe to my channel and stay up to date on all my latest videos.